If you have registered for the Conference, please login to your account on the BAM website to pre-register your place on the PDWs of your choice (see full list below). Please note that some PDWs have a restricted number of places and will be allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis. 

In order to pre-register for PDWs, please ensure you have registered for the Conference first.

PDWs Round 1: Tuesday 31st August, 10:45-12:00

1.  Successful Case Teaching Online and In-person: Hints and Tips

2.  Shock & Awe: What the pandemic has taught us about effective HRM in healthcare and what it means for systems transformation in the post-Covid era

3.  Publishing Management Learning and Education Research: Meet the Editors and Paper Development Workshop

4.  How to grow a small consulting firm towards sale or investment

5.  Accountability and Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem

6.  Mental Health and Wellness for Business School Academics

7.  Helping students to reflect effectively This PDW has been withdrawn, please select an alternative workshop 

8.  Writing routines for better writing productivity: how to enjoy writing, maintain scholarly output and keep balance in your life

9.  A two-way street: Stimulating the flow of knowledge between HE and workplace in a work-based postgraduate Master’s programme for senior leaders

10.  Collegiality in Contemporary Higher Education: What were the consequences of Covid-19 and what might be the lasting effects?

11.  Understanding algorithms: implications for legitimacy and trust

12.  Recovering from COVID-19: Responsible Management of Academics Mental Health in the New Normal

PDWs Round 2: Wednesday 1st September, 17:20-18:35

13.  Big Data Qualitative Research Analysis Using NVivo R1 - FULLY BOOKED

14.  Reinvigorating Courage into Boardroom Conversations: Values-infused, Foresight-driven Governance for the 21st Century

15.  Deconstructing Stereotypes of Women of Colour in Leadership: Role of Reverse Mentoring

16.  From Decolonial Theory to Pedagogies of Transformation: Towards a decolonial agenda in teaching and learning practice in business and management

17.  Marketing Yourself as an Early-career Researcher

18.  A New Toolkit for Developing Requisite Business Agility

19.  Exploring Publication Ethics: Identifying and Responding to Perceived Ethics Issues

20.  Aristotle and 'practical wisdom' - philosophical lessons from the past, as the foundation for future business and management pedagogy This PDW has been withdrawn, please select an alternative workshop 

21.  Engaged Scholarship in a Post-Covid World: Explorations of Methodological Challenges in Management Practice Fields

PDWs Round 3: Friday 3rd September, 08:45-10:00 

22.  Co-creation of SDG literacy; sowing the seeds for transformational change in Civic Society

23.  Bridging differing perspectives on ecosystems research: Towards an integrative framework

24.  Decolonising your curriculum: Moving beyond reading lists

25.  What management consultants want from academics

26.  Effective Trans-National Education (TNE) partnership and students sense of belonging

27.  Introducing Engaged Scholarship and an Opportunity to Join the Engaged Scholarship Learning Lab

28.  The Value of Play in Management Education

29.  Developing Inter-personal skills for Conducting Qualitative Research Interviews

30.  Relocating the HR Department to the lecture room using Blackboard’s collaborate ultra platform: An undergraduate and postgraduate HR assessment perspective, during the Covid pandemic

31.  Professional Practice Readiness in Occupational and Business Psychology (O&BP)

32.  Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA)

33.  Is Design-Driven Innovation the Next Competitive Advantage? An online participative-style workshop

1. Successful Case Teaching Online and In-person: Hints and Tips 1. Successful Case Teaching Online and In-person: Hints and Tips

This workshop, run by The Case Centre and led by our expert tutor Dr. Scott Andrews, is an invaluable opportunity for delegates to find out more about the case method and case teaching. It is a great introduction to case teaching for newcomers and also suitable for case teachers looking for fresh inspiration in the classroom. It will demonstrate why the case method is such a powerful learning tool in management education whether used in online teaching or in the physical classroom.

Participants will explore how to manage large group case discussions and small group work via breakout rooms, in both online and face to face classrooms. The tutor will show how different cases can provide the basis for dynamic classroom discussions, critical enquiry and decision making, leading to new insights and understanding that meets pre-determined learning objectives across a multitude of disciplines within management education.

Throughout the session, the tutor will demonstrate how to ensure maximum participant involvement and how to get the most out of the case study. By providing feedback on the mechanics of a case teaching session, the tutor will illustrate best practice and provide useful hints and tips on how to improve the classroom experience for both students and teachers. The tutor will also explain the key principles of the case method, discuss the benefits and pitfalls, share good practice online, and encourage delegates to reflect on their own experiences.

2. Shock and Awe – What the pandemic has taught us about effective HRM in healthcare and what it means for systems transformation in the post-Covid era 2. Shock and Awe – What the pandemic has taught us about effective HRM in healthcare and what it means for systems transformation in the post-Covid era

Healthcare organisations globally have been operating at more than maximum capacity during the Covid-19 crisis and even robust health systems have been harshly stress-tested. In addition to sheer volume of traffic, the pandemic has necessitated multiple changes in the organisation and delivery of clinical services, increased the need for recruitment, retention and re-deployment (e.g., retirees), necessitated more integrated health and social care systems, placed greater emphasis on the use of data and technologies, and magnified staff stress and absence. This has forced Human Resource Management (HRM) leaders to re-imagine and reconfigure their existing work practices and information systems and forced a greater emphasis on the need to balance efficiency/effectiveness with empathy/support.

This interactive workshop aims to bring together HRM leaders, practitioners and researchers to discuss some of the ways in which healthcare organizations have responded, coped, transformed and innovated during the crisis. The objectives are to understand the nature and impacts of these changes, consider how the positive learning can be carried forward in the post-pandemic era, inform recommendations for practice and articulate an agenda for new research or policy. We also aim to catalyse a virtual network of practitioners and researchers with an interest in this topic.

The workshop will consist of short talks and interactive discussions addressing the following non-exhaustive list of topics:

Part 1: The challenges or disruptions that Covid-19 has caused to the work of healthcare organizations, and the HRM-related responses of health organizations to Covid-19 (led by Aizhan Tursunbayeva)

Part 2. The role of technology (e.g., e-HRM; AI, analytics) in responsible people management during or post Covid-19 (led by Tanya Bondarouk)

Part 3: Ethics of HRM during or post Covid-19 (led by Claudia Pagliari)

The workshop will be of interest to international multi-disciplinary researchers and practitioners who have been studying or participating in HRM developments during the pandemic, and/or are keen to study the changes necessitated by this ‘emergency global experiment’.

3. Publishing Management Learning and Education Research: Meet the Editors and Paper Development Workshop 3. Publishing Management Learning and Education Research: Meet the Editors and Paper Development Workshop

Management learning and education is a well-established area of study. Yet many business school scholars remain unclear about the tweaks, differences in orientation and emphasis between journals in the field. This PDW will provide participants with general and one-to-one support and advice from Editors and Associate Editors of two leading, international journals this domain: Academy of Management Learning & Education, and the Management Learning. The workshop is split in two parts. First, editors introduce their journals followed by a discussion with the audience. This will enable participants to understand the differences between the journals and to more effectively orient their paper towards a specific outlet. The second part of the workshop is focused on manuscripts submitted ahead of the workshop. The facilitators will offer feedback, in small groups, to help improve these manuscripts and to better address the readership of specific journals in the field.

4. How to grow a small consulting firm towards sale or investment 4. How to grow a small consulting firm towards sale or investment

How do you grow a consulting firm as an asset which has value? Over 200 consultancies are sold each-year and a similar amount receive private equity investment. Around 25% of these have revenues of less than £5m. How is this done?

Based upon a three year research project, combining over 80 interviews with founders who have sold, buyers, M&A specialists and private equity directors, Prof. Joe O'Mahoney has just completed a book detailing how this can be done.

This workshop provides an overview of the value strategies that firms use to grow towards some form of equity event and provides attendees with practical tools for thinking about creating value in the firm.

Joe has used this advice to successfully guide over 40 firms in pursuit of growth and will be dispelling some common myths which people incorrectly lead to more profitable firms.

5. Accountability and Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem 5. Accountability and Ethics in a Digital Ecosystem

The emergence of digital ecosystems presents both opportunities and challenges. Their existence provides businesses with the opportunity to collaborate, create and co-create new products and services with other businesses and their end- users. At the same time that a digital ecosystem presents business and users with new sources of value, a host of accountability and ethical challenges arise out of the diversity of actors and entities involved. The actors include businesses developing and implementing data- driven services, digital platform owners, third-party application developers, regulators and users. Technological entities include the networks, digital platforms, applications and data flows that constitute the technical infrastructure of a digital ecosystem.

The SPRITE+ Accountability and Ethics Challenge Working Group (ACCEDE) is addressing the following challenges:

In the BAM workshop we aim to facilitate a collaborative discussion to add to our data exploration and project experience. 

6. Mental Health and Wellness for Business School Academics 6. Mental Health and Wellness for Business School Academics

This PDW will be informed by the BAM Strategic Project for Mental Health and Wellness. The PDW will commence with the Core Project Team providing a background to the project and its evolution. Salient findings from the data collected (to date) will be presented, we will present the main themes and any unexpected findings. We are keen to test the face validity of our data with the PDW participants.

We intend to also obtain participant feedback linked to the conference themes recovering from Covid, responsible management and reshaping the economy:

Since this is partially an interactive workshop, numbers of participants will be limited to 30 people. The project is focused on employed status academics in UK Universities, therefore we would ask participants to bear this in mind before electing to sign up for this PDW.

The feedback from the PDW will be captured and allow the Core Research Group to reflect on how this might shape the evolution of the project.

7. Helping students to reflect effectively (WITHDRAWN, please select an alternative) 7. Helping students to reflect effectively (WITHDRAWN, please select an alternative)

Despite extensive literature on reflective learning, effective reflective practices (that is, the cognitive and behavioural steps leading to deep reflection) remain often elusive. Educators can struggle to define learning outcomes and assessment criteria in ways that scaffold student learning and enable both written and creative approaches to reflection. Misunderstandings can arise, for example, when students assume that effective reflection necessitates emotional intensity or when they perceive that creative approaches automatically get them a higher grade. Students can then become frustrated, devalue reflection and disengage, while educators may decide that reflective work should be used sparingly and certainly never be assessed.

However, research from the health sciences and teaching shows that reflective learning is an essential means to enable students to develop a professional identity as practitioners in their chosen line of work. With increasing professionalization in the management field (e.g. HRM, project management), there is a need to make reflective learning more tangible to both students and educators in order to support students’ ability to use deep reflection to deal with tension and dilemma in their work and to build their resilience throughout their career. 

Co-led by researchers from the health sciences and management, this professional development workshop seeks to explore what students and practitioners do when they reflect well. Delegates will be encouraged to consider their own (or their students’) experiences of reflection and considers methods to scaffold students’ reflective endeavours and to coach them towards effective reflection as part of their personal and professional development. 

8. Writing routines for better writing productivity: how to enjoy writing, maintain scholarly output and keep balance in your life 8. Writing routines for better writing productivity: how to enjoy writing, maintain scholarly output and keep balance in your life

The goal of this PDW is to give you strategies to apply to your writing or to use to support the writing development of others. You will come away with a template for a productive writing routine.

This PDW will be of value to

(i) anyone who would like to become more productive in their scholarly writing. (ii) anyone who is supervising or supporting doctoral researchers or other early career researchers by providing ways to help them develop productive approaches to writing at the outset of their academic career.

 

Scholarly output is the key vehicle for our impact and personal progression. It is how we engage with our peers and put forward our ideas. Yet, writing can be a frustrating process. It is also an aspect of academic life that is relatively unsupported by training or professional development; we are expected to become academic writers without any significant formal instruction. This tension has been exacerbated by the past year of intensified work and reduced peer support.

In this short PDW you will be introduced to ideas on writing from scholars in academic writing development. The central idea is that a planned and focused writing routine will allow you to be a productive writer and maintain balance in your life. We will look at how to plan time for writing and how to maintain optimal focus during writing sessions. You will have the opportunity to try these practices and reflect on your own approaches to writing, both helpful and unhelpful.

9. A two-way street: Stimulating the flow of knowledge between HE and workplace in a work-based postgraduate Master’s programme for senior leaders 9. A two-way street: Stimulating the flow of knowledge between HE and workplace in a work-based postgraduate Master’s programme for senior leaders

This interactive PDW sits within the theme of work-based learning - an explicit merging of theory with practice, knowledge and experience (Raelin, 2008) - with a specific focus on the flow of knowledge between those who facilitate a postgraduate work-based senior leadership programme within Executive Education in HE, and the students who lead and manage their organisations on a daily basis. Senior leaders enrol as postgraduate students on a programme of study in order to learn more about leadership, with the aim of becoming better leaders and managers within their individual contexts, and of course we as university tutors like to think that we are successful in helping them in this goal. In such a partnership, the Executive Education department recognises it is not the sole custodian of knowledge and that, during the current period of seismic change, it is those who lead organisations who are accruing first-hand knowledge and experience. It can be argued then that a key role for Executive Education is in providing the conduits for this knowledge and experience to flow, not only to and fro between departmental staff and students, but between the students themselves, and into their organisations, thus fostering a matrix of knowledge flow.

This workshop will be highly interactive, with starting points delivered by the presenters providing the opportunity to discuss different ways by which knowledge and experience can be shared widely. The presenters believe this to be timely in light of the theme of the conference where the rate of learning needs to at least equal the rate of change (Revans, 1992) and would be keen to develop a group of academics and facilitators to share practice and potential research opportunities into the efficacy of various sharing formats

10. Collegiality in Contemporary Higher Education: What were the consequences of Covid-19 and what might be the lasting effects? 10. Collegiality in Contemporary Higher Education: What were the consequences of Covid-19 and what might be the lasting effects?

Organizers:

  • Rick Delbridge (Cardiff)
  • Paolo Quattrone (Manchester)

We explore the role of collegiality in responding to the impact of Covid-19, asking what the lasting effects might be. Professor Rachel Ashworth (Dean, Cardiff Business School) will discuss how her school responded to the challenges of Covid-19 and the various ways in which collegiality was central to this. Professor Kerstin Sahlin (Uppsala University) will provide an overview of some initial findings from an international study that she is leading. The project compares case studies of collegial aspects of response to the Corona pandemic from 16 international partners.

Discussion points include:

  1. From greater collegiality to increased regulation?

Initial responses produced a sense of collegiality with colleagues commenting on how barriers between hierarchical levels and business functions were easily overcome, regaining a sense of shared purpose in what universities do. Has this window of opportunity for greater local autonomy in UK universities closed?

  1. From performance evaluation to well-being considerations?

A positive initial effect of the pandemic was a shift in focus from performance evaluation to attention to well-being. ‘Non-performing’ staff have become colleagues with pressing family and personal problems who need help to function in stressful circumstances. The question is whether this ‘equalizing’ dynamic will survive.

  1. Collegiality: where and when?

The dynamic of points 1 and 2 has not been unfolding in the same way within or across universities and seems to have been dependent on which institutional and organizational level these developments took place.

  1. Formal governance and informal communication?

UK higher education has a separated administrative and academic staff on independent lines of accountability. Has the pandemic affected this governance mechanism in delivering rapid responses and with what longer-term effects?

11. Understanding algorithms: implications for legitimacy and trust 11. Understanding algorithms: implications for legitimacy and trust

This PDW is concerned with the management implications of the growing use of algorithms in social life. Managing user uptake and acceptance of algorithms appears to be a key skill for data-driven organisations. However, evidence suggests there is increasing social pushback against these algorithms and the organisations developing them. This pushback raises questions about the legitimacy of algorithmic management of individual behaviour, trust in organisations and acceptance of technology, among other issues. Devising strategies which enable organisations to manage these dimensions appears to be a key aspect to delivering positive outcomes from the increasing deployment of algorithms and the associated digital transformation.

The workshop will revolve around three topics:

1) the effects of algorithmic management on the trustworthiness and legitimacy of organisations.

2) the development of business models that empower users and involve them in the process of algorithmic management.

3) research methods and theoretical perspectives for researching the relationships between algorithms and organisations, users, and society.

This will be an interactive PDW following the World Café format. A series of prompts will be circulated to participants before the session. Participants will be divided into three discussion groups – corresponding to the themes above – and will feed their reflections to the assembly at the end. The result will be horizon-scanning of the topic of research. The ambition of the workshop is to establish the roots of a multidisciplinary network of academics researching these topics across the management discipline and beyond.

12. Recovering from COVID-19: Responsible Management of Academics Mental Health in the New Normal 12. Recovering from COVID-19: Responsible Management of Academics Mental Health in the New Normal

This PDW takes up the call to address responsible management of academics’ mental health in the new normal of dealing with and recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. The workshop aims to raise awareness of the growing, often hidden, mental health and resilience issues in the academic community. Prior to COVID-19, academics and researchers were already confronting multiple workplace challenges that posed occupational risks to their wellbeing (e.g., massification of tertiary education, changing university business models, work intensification, increasing and often conflicting performance demands). The global pandemic has added further stressors including lost time in research due to care giving responsibilities, shift to on-line delivery mode in teaching, gender gap in submissions to journals etc., that creates stress that undermines their mental health.

This workshop will encourage participants to identify the major stressors academics are experiencing and develop positive management responses to address them.  Recommendations for systemic changes will be developed by the participants for stimulating dialogue with their line managers and university administrators. In addition, the workshop activities will provide participants with a template for later use in initiating post-COVID mental health conversations with their colleagues.

13. Big Data Qualitative Research Analysis Using NVivo R1 13. Big Data Qualitative Research Analysis Using NVivo R1

The Professional Development Workshop which will be held aims to provide participants with a foundation and knowledge in using the NVIVO qualitative software application in conducting data analysis (big data) through thematic, semantic, and social network analysis content. The one-hour workshop includes an introduction to the software, the analysis process, and visualization in qualitative reports. After attending the workshop, participants were able to increase their skills in doing big data analysis based on NVIVO qualitative software. The estimated attendance is 20-30 people. During the session, there was a question-and-answer interaction and a poll as well as a software demo.

14. Reinvigorating Courage into Boardroom Conversations: Values-infused, Foresight-driven Governance for the 21st Century 14. Reinvigorating Courage into Boardroom Conversations: Values-infused, Foresight-driven Governance for the 21st Century

The prevailing narrative is that a pandemic took the world by ‘surprise’.  Supra-national organizations, nation states, policy-makers, and multi-national enterprises (“MNE’s”) have been criticized for failing to either recognize or act upon signposts of possible pandemic, to the detriment of our societal health. Current governance practice appears to have ignored one of its fundamental utilities – to govern for sustainability.  Traditional governance emphasizing oversight, compliance, planning and risk management has ignored weak signals and signposts of emergent change and challenges that have severely disrupted our status quo; governance as a practice has wilfully ignored the strategic significance of businesses that goes beyond winning and surviving, but on fulfilling their obligation to society-in-turmoil. Passive-reactive approaches to pivoting and opportunistic behaviours for profiting abound.  

Long-term sustainability of business relies on a shared understanding and enactment of moral, ethical, social, and environmental values. Absent these values, boards fall into management groupthink, rubber-stamping recommendations, overlooking strategic blind spots, trading-off stakeholder interests and thus compromising boards’ independence to effectively and proactively govern. We introduce two new board development models as the gold standard for 21st century organizational governance : values-driven futures-literate (VDFL) directorship and values-infused foresight-driven (VIFD) board governance. Building on these two concepts, we share with workshop participants a set of board principles for use in board development, training, evaluation and recruitment, to build values awareness and alignment amongst directors and their organizations, and stimulate proactive, forward-thinking and long-term orientation.

15. Deconstructing Stereotypes of Women of Color in Leadership: Role of Reverse Mentoring 15. Deconstructing Stereotypes of Women of Color in Leadership: Role of Reverse Mentoring

As work becomes more gender and racially diverse, women of color encounter continuous obstacles to achieve and function in leadership roles. While Caucasian and colored women face similar gender issues, the factors that determine their path to success are significantly different (Key et al., 2012). Yet, racial issues are often ignored, despite the fact that race has a detrimental impact on occupational prestige compared to gender (Xu & Leffler, 1992). One chronic challenge for women leaders of color is limited access to leadership developmental network that is critical for career advancement. In this context, there is scarcity of studies that have examined about structural characteristics of the developmental networks among women of color in the crucial leadership roles/positions. Further, influence of such developmental relationships in fostering knowledge sharing and visibility of this underrepresented group also needs attention. Leaders struggle to promote individuals of underrepresented groups because they adopt developmental strategies based on their own experiences (Roberts et al., 2018). As one HR strategy to create more inclusive cultures, reverse mentoring is an inverted kind of mentoring relationship whereby the senior and seasoned employee in an organization is paired with a less experienced junior employee, except that the traditional roles are reversed (Chaudhuri & Ghosh, 2012). A reverse mentoring approach will deconstruct the stereotypes of colored women leaders and create a new lens to address racial segregation (Zauschner-Studnicka, 2017). As the presence of colored women in leadership roles increases it is critical to understand their experiences and factors that contribute to pathways for their success. 

The purpose of the PDW is first to engage discussion on how reverse mentoring initiatives and enhancing participation in reverse mentoring equips senior management with requisite competencies for addressing the socio-cultural challenges and issues faced by women of color in leadership roles. Second, this PDW will offer insights to the audience regarding the potential avenues and suggesting research agendas, potential methodological approaches and scope of further scholarly works on developmental relationships challenges and barriers hampering gender diversity progression with a focus on women of color in leadership positions. Third, it would encourage individual participants to delve deeply into key questions and sub-topics on characteristics of the developmental networks augmenting career advancement for women of color in leadership positions through engaging in rigorous small group discussions. This approach will help attract scholars who are already doing research on the PDW theme and sub-theme areas and exploring possible expansion of their research areas and addition of new dimensions to their own work. Overall, our PDW aims to fulfill the following main goals:

  1. Building and expanding community of scholars interested in researching on developmental relationships (e.g. mentoring, reverse mentoring, multiple mentoring) and associated biases pertinent to gender stereotypes.
  2. Advancing scholarly domain of developmental relationships and diversity literature scholarship by attracting and bridging boundaries between scholars from diverse backgrounds.
  3. Forging future joint collaborations and conversations for targeting conference sessions and joint research publications in reputed journals. 

16. From Decolonial Theory to Pedagogies of Transformation: Towards a decolonial agenda in teaching and learning practice in business and management 16. From Decolonial Theory to Pedagogies of Transformation: Towards a decolonial agenda in teaching and learning practice in business and management

This PDW aspires to generate concrete examples of how business management educators can transform their teaching and learning practice through decolonial approaches. This workshop builds on the work carried out by emerging networks to bring together educators who have experimented with decolonial thinking and praxis in their teaching and learning and generate succinct case studies. The key objectives of the workshop are: to generate case studies that integrate a decolonial approach and to facilitate cross-national and inter-regional dialoguing to establish the form and future direction of a decolonial agenda in business and management pedagogy. Through a carefully curated format, the workshop will facilitate a generative dialogue that centers experiences of teaching diverse as well as homogenous student groups and recognises the tensions and power dynamics that emerge in educational settings when we teach critically. The PDW will include presentations on the meaning and key features of decolonial thinking in business and management, and the praxis of decolonial thinking. Discussions will focus on three areas: (1) cross-national learning that centres indigenous knowledge, multi-vocal and multi-disciplinary methodologies, and the challenges of teaching with a cross-national framework in an Anglo-centric learning environment, (2) the decolonial case study approach that foregrounds the politics of representation, challenging archetypes of business success, and providing students and teachers with alternatives to market capitalism, and (3) experiential un/learning that engages with the potential for transformational pedagogies, pedagogies of the oppressed, and working with personal reflexivity as a tool for building a praxis-centered framework for decolonial thinking.

 17. Marketing Yourself as an Early-career Researcher 17. Marketing Yourself as an Early-career Researcher

The aim of this prospective workshop is to help early-career researchers (ECRs) market themselves as academics, navigate the field of business and management and engage with the relevant audience, both online and offline. Self-promotion is a skill many ECRs lack or are unsure how to approach. In this workshop we aim to bring leading academics and BAM fellows to share their insights into establishing a career in academic and what ECRs can do now to enhance their future prospects. In the past 18 months, ECRs have been disproportionally disadvantaged in comparison to academics in later stages on their careers. As such self-promotion, especially leveraging online channels, has become particularly important. Our proposed workshop will constitute of two talks, namely, ‘Finding and Engaging with your Research Community’, and ‘Twitter for research promotion and academic networking’. Talks will be given by Prof. Helen Shipton and Prof. Emma Parry respectively and will last for 30 minutes each followed by a 15-minute discussion. It is our vision to bring senior academics and a multidisciplinary ECRs cohort together in a collegial and friendly session where we hope to foster learning, offer support, and stimulate thought-provoking discussions on how to boost an academic career through personal promotion.

18. A New Toolkit for Developing Business Agility 18. A New Toolkit for Developing Business Agility

The 2021 an IBM survey of 3,000 Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) found that: “After the uncertainty of the past year, CEOs stress organizational agility — the capability of an organization to respond quickly and pivot without losing momentum — as a top priority for leaders to an unprecedented degree”. An earlier report  by Forbes had examined the views of 506 senior executives and found that “92 percent of executives believe that organizational agility, or the ability to rapidly respond to market conditions and external factors, is critical to business success”. However, a 2020 IMD survey of 550 executives revealed that executives struggled with how to build greater business agility.

In short, numerous surveys show that, for many managers and organisation development professionals, Agility is a broad aspiration but is a ‘black-box’, meaning that there is a lack of clarity as to how to facilitate agility orientated organisation development. The newly published seven-step EAfA (Exploiting Agility for Advantage) process provides tools to manage agile organisation development. It offers a realistic definition of agility (seeing Agility as a strategic choice not a fashionable imperative) and a comprehensive set of constructs and tools for acquiring requisite organisational agility. 

The workshop will describe the EAfA approach and explore the implications for managers, University Teachers, Learning & Development Specialists and Consultants.

19. Exploring Publication Ethics: Identifying and Responding to Perceived Ethics Issues 19. Exploring Publication Ethics: Identifying and Responding to Perceived Ethics Issues

In an age of rapid technological change coupled with intense focus on the need for researchers to publish to achieve career advancement, questions around ethical publication practices are becoming increasingly pertinent for editors, reviewers, and researchers. As submissions and published outputs rise, so too do cases of authorship disputes, data manipulation, plagiarism and poor attribution standards, to name some of the most common issues.

Drawing on research published by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), with the support of Routledge (part of the Taylor & Francis group) on publication ethics in the social sciences, this PDW aims to provide a hands-on approach to recognizing and responding to common challenges for authors, reviewers, and journal editors. Through a combination of short presentations, discussion of anonymized case studies, and open Q&A sessions we will look at questions such as: What constitutes a fraudulent submission to a journal, and what do you do when you identify it? How do you recognize and address bias in reviewer comments? What outcomes are available in the event that unethical practice is established? 

Led by representatives of COPE / Routledge and Journal Editors, it is aimed at all those involved in the scholarly publication process in whatever capacity, including early career researchers, and thus is open to all BAM 2021 delegates. 

20. Aristotle and 'practical wisdom' WITHDRAWN (please select an alternative) 20. Aristotle and 'practical wisdom' WITHDRAWN (please select an alternative)

Current discussions on management education have started to consider concepts derived from Aristotelian philosophy (Aristotle, 1984), specifically with reference to two of the forms of intelligence defined by Aristotle: phronesis and episteme (Antonacopoulou, 2010; Chia, 2009; Nonaka et al., 2014; Ramsey, 2014; Shotter and Tsoukas, 2014a, 2014b). Following Flyvbjerg (2001, p. 56) episteme concerns theoretical ‘know why’, techne denotes technical knowhow, and phronesis covers both practical knowledge, practical wisdom, and practical ethics.  The latter is considered a meta virtue and provides the appropriate reasons, emotions, and motivations to decide what (and why) to do in each specific situation we face. 

In traditional business school teaching, there tends to be an emphasis on episteme, with management being understood from a scientific view perspective as something which can be clearly “formalised, codified and generalised”. Arguably, this approach lends itself to the transmission of supposedly rational knowledge, working on the assumption that actors in organisations construct a mental representation of their actions before taking them.  Following this logic, action is structured with reference to predefined models (Chia, 2009) and reflection happens always prior to action. 

Having been part of Higher Education environments and having witnessed the potentially negative consequences, and limitations of an episteme-centric learning experience, the authors argue that there is a need to rebalance management education to include more contextualised and experiential forms of knowledge.  Forms of management education are required that bring head, hands, and heart together (Sipos et al. 2008).

The primary objective of this workshop is thus to answer the following question: 

“What can we learn from Aristotle’s notion of phronesis, as a philosophical foundation for pedagogy in business and management?”

The structure of the workshop is as follows. First, the background is given to the philosophical debate currently taking place around the notion of phronesis in business and management. 

Following this, there is an examination of the topic of phronesis in the context of some of the authors’ teaching interventions in executive leadership and change management education. Next, there is a discussion of phronesis as seen from workshop participants’ points of view.  Finally, we will sum up and consider implications for future work. 

21. Engaged Scholarship in a Post-Covid World: Explorations of Methodological Challenges in Management Practice Fields 21. Engaged Scholarship in a Post-Covid World: Explorations of Methodological Challenges in Management Practice Fields

The demand on faculty to deploy their knowledge in more engaged and impactful ways has never been greater. Yet, the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic has compounded and escalated many of the considerations, transforming the context and re-shaping some of the research. So, what’s different now and what are the new challenges for engaged research? This session builds on a series of successful PDWs delivered in successive BAM and Eastern Academy of Management conferences and offers a continuation of an ongoing dialogue in a critical area

22. Co-creation of SDG literacy; sowing the seeds for transformational change in Civic Society 22. Co-creation of SDG literacy; sowing the seeds for transformational change in Civic Society

The massification (Harrison, 2015) of education has created much international diversity in the student mix, providing real opportunity for peer-peer intercultural dialogue and a widening of perspectives through harnessing the power of student collaboration and foregrounding the global ‘student voice.’ With the United Nations’s ambitious 2030 SDG targets, it is more crucial than ever that universities provide structured inclusive spaces for students to interact with peers to develop intercultural competence (ICC), a key competence for the 21st century (Deardorff, 2015) in order to nurture globally-minded citizens of the future.

This workshop will explore how Intercultural student-led podcasting may provide a sustainable and scalable way of facilitating much-needed globalised conversation and ICC informed SDG literacy in a post-covid world by foregrounding and harnessing the power of co-creation that speaks to the digital natives; ‘Gen-Z’. The workshop will focus on practical ways in which critical perspectives on ‘internationalisation’ can be achieved and challenges overcome through exploring a successful faculty- wide ICC co-created student-podcaster project at the University of Leeds, UK. Cultural Insight Wednesdays (CIW) is a student-led platform for both international students and home students that enables students from all backgrounds to share their cultural capital and lived experience(s) with fellow students on a range of global topics such as; sustainable fashion and Corporate Social Responsibility.

In this way, it is hoped that we can help sow the seeds of normalising greater globalised connected ways of ‘thinking’ and ‘knowing’, that stre beyond the bounds of traditional disciplinary boundaries within the academy to help shape the future leaders of tomorrow to address the grand challenges facing humanity.

Workshop takeaways

- Better understanding of how to facilitate more critical intercultural dialogue around SDG literacy / Student community building in an  inclusive, sustainable and scalable way .

- Evidence-based insights into the intersection between critical 'internationalisation at home' and 'decolonisation of the co/curricular' through co-creation

- Insights into potential impact on Student Experience across all levels of study of student-led opportunity

23. Bridging differing perspectives on ecosystems research: Towards an integrative framework 23. Bridging differing perspectives on ecosystems research: Towards an integrative framework

Management practitioners and scholars alike use a range of terms such as industry, sector, and market to describe and characterise an organisation’s environment. More recently, the word ecosystem, a term borrowed from the field of biology, has entered the lexicon. This PDW’s objective is to facilitate discussions, synergies and new connections with the community of researchers and practitioners to bring conceptual clarity to ecosystem notions, e.g. business ecosystems, innovation ecosystems, platform ecosystems and entrepreneurial ecosystems. Today, the ecosystem literature is growing but also increasingly fragmented. Despite conceptual similarities, different strands with interesting contributions made by scholars from innovation, strategy, and entrepreneurship fields develop in silos.

The literature lacks detail in relation to what the interfaces and connections are between the different ecosystem research streams. Hence, this PDW aims to addresses how different school of thoughts regarding ecosystems can be aligned.

Given the above, our intention is to discuss the following during the PDW: What do ecosystems explain? What explains ecosystems?

This PDW will bring together a diverse range of scholars from strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship across the SIGs within the British Academy of Management. The organising committee will facilitate a virtual workshop to encourage interaction and exchange of ideas among participants that do not typically participate in the same paper sessions. In doing so, we aim to align conceptualisations of ecosystems from different perspectives. Following a short presentation session by the speakers, we will invite attendees to engage in conversation to address the above questions from theoretical and empirical perspectives using interactive Zoom tools. We aim to continue our engagement with the academic community beyond this PDW and develop our collective work into an edited book and/or a journal special issue proposal.

Following a short presentation session by the speakers, we will invite attendees to engage in conversation to address the above questions from theoretical and empirical perspectives using interactive Zoom tools. We aim to develop our collective work into an edited book and/or a journal special issue proposal.

24. Decolonising your curriculum: Moving beyond reading lists 24. Decolonising your curriculum: Moving beyond reading lists

Decolonisation begins at the forefront of pedagogical practices. Despite efforts to address decolonisation using the inclusive curriculum framework (ICF), there remain a drop in the progression, retention and attainment of BAME students in UK HE institutions. On the premise that decolonisation lies at the heart of the PGCert in HE curriculum design at UoG, this workshop will provide a space for delegates to gain deeper understanding of decolonising teaching practice through the use of a modified ICF to evaluate and map their current teaching practices. The insights drawn from the evaluation activity will contribute to the development of action points to address gaps in their pedagogical practices. The result will increase awareness in the design of module and teaching materials and activities by academics which draw on and represent the cultural and lived experiences of students attending their classes. The improved design will contribute to a student-centered experience which heighten student engagement and produces lively interaction and improvement attainment.

25. What management consultants want from academics 25. What management consultants want from academics

Although management consultants and academics studying management share a common topic there is less exchange of ideas than one might expect. The insights of each should be helpful to the other, and in particular there may be areas where consultants would profit from the application of recent academic research or working in partnership on projects in specific circumstances. The preferences of consultants and consultancy firms in identifying and realising these opportunities will be of value to academics who would like to increase the scope of cooperation. 

The Centre for Management Consulting Excellence (CMCE) has carried out research among consultants and consultancy organisations to establish what these preferences are. The findings will be presented at the PDW, with the opportunity to discuss them and their implications for the academic community. This should be of great interest to researchers who want to carry out research of value to consultants and managers in general; increase the impact of their research; and increase the possibility of partnering with consultants on projects. 

The workshop will be led by Karol Szlichcinski and chaired by Calvert Markham. Karol is Associate Director of CMCE; he has 30 years’ experience as a management consultant and was also a Professor at the University of Silesia School of Management, Katowice, Poland.  Calvert is the founder and was the first Director of CMCE.  He was formerly a Visiting Fellow in the practice of management consultancy at Cass Business School (now Bayes Business School) of City, University of London; President of the UK Institute of Consulting and a Vice Chairman of the International Council of Management Consulting Institutes. 

 

26. Effective Trans-National Education (TNE) partnership and students sense of belonging 26. Effective Trans-National Education (TNE) partnership and students sense of belonging

This PDW builds upon a Learning and Teaching project run by the facilitators in collaboration with Trans-National Education (TNE) Partners focussed on international business modules. Internationalisation has become key to HE sustainability and growth within and beyond the UK.  For an effective TNE partnership, “dynamic collaborative process between educational institutions that brings mutual thoughts…share[d] ownership of the projects…(and)…decisions…taken jointly” are needed (The British Council, 2015, p.8). At the same time, recent work has linked belongingness and sense of community with student retention, progression and success. Our project is designed to investigate both tutors’ perception regarding the partnership and students’ perception about their sense of belongingness to our university through TNE partnerships.   

Through the PDW, we would like to  

1. Share the preliminary findings from our research and the related collaborative event run as part of this project 

2. Discuss our recommendations towards building an effective partnership with TNE partner tutors based on emerging themes around support, ownership, autonomy, communication, partnership, differing teaching styles and culture from our preliminary findings from interviews with the tutors and focus groups with students  

3. Share our experiences of designing and facilitating a virtual event for TNE partner students  

4. Encourage delegates to share their ideas and experiences towards building up a collaborative picture of how to run and support an effective TNE partnership through virtual events.  

Our aim for the PDW is to have an interactive workshop where delegates participate in and contribute to tangible ideas and action plans in shaping TNE partnerships so that they can apply them to their own practice. Our longer-term goal is to foster this dialogue across and beyond Business disciplines, which can form a wide scope of community of practice incorporating multi-/inter-disciplinary and multi-/cross-cultural groups of academics who have the same passion towards supporting and enhancing TNE partnerships. 

27. Introducing Engaged Scholarship and an Opportunity to Join the Engaged Scholarship Learning Lab 27. Introducing Engaged Scholarship and an Opportunity to Join the Engaged Scholarship Learning Lab

Engaged Scholarship emerged from concern that management research is rarely read or applied by managers. In Van de Ven’s seminal book (2007) he argued that managers are more likely to use research if involved in shaping research problems and sensemaking. In this respect, developing knowledge with practitioners brings us, as academics, closer to the complex situations and sensemaking we research and practitioners are more likely to change in light of knowledge if they buy into research questions and are involved in research. Engaged Scholarship creates spaces, relationships and ways of translating and sharing knowledge (both academic and practitioner) to shape research that is useful and supports innovation and empowerment (Rouse and Woolnough, 2018). This can be challenging and complex work yet necessary if we are to create and deliver impactful research. The proposed workshop is aimed at both Early Careers Researchers and more experienced academics who are interested in Engaged Scholarship. It has two aims. First, to spark curiosity in the benefits of adopting an Engaged Scholarship methodology and to begin to explore why and how researchers can design research projects, shape and test ideas and reflect on the implications of findings to management problems with practitioners. Second to invite researchers to join the Engaged Scholarship Learning Lab, a partnership between UKRI, Manchester Metropolitan University and BAM that will work for two years to raise capacity in Engaged Scholarship.

 

28. The Value of Play in Management Education 28. The Value of Play in Management Education

Play in the form of games, roleplay and simulations is well-established in management education, however play is being used for university learning in many other ways. In this workshop we will focus on the use and value of play in higher education; the subject of my two year study 2019-2021, funded by the Imagination Lab Foundation. This Swiss-based, independent and not-for-profit research entity supports scholarship complementing traditional management and organization theories with ideas from the arts, sciences, imagination and play. 

Conducting this research in a pandemic has underscored the importance play has for our psychological, social and emotional well-being. This applies also to playful pedagogic practices which enable our students to feel connected: to their course, their discipline, their academic  & wider communities and to their future. (Play is also widely used, and has obvious relevance for, management in the workplace also).

The study as a whole, and this workshop, are strongly rooted in pedagogic literature and play theory, to which they will also contribute.  A key theoretical touchpoint is Sutton-Smith’s framework of Seven Rhetorics of Play (1997), which are given new consideration in the context of management HE. 

Participants in this workshop will gain insights into the growth of playful/play-based learning in HE internationally. They will relate project findings on play at university to their own contexts in management education, and understand key challenges and enhancers. By sharing examples from across the disciplines, as well as from management,  I will illustrate perceptions of value and impact. These include heightening motivation, improving adaptability, stretching thinking, building relationships, grasping difficult material and forging connections. 

Whatever your role, institution or discipline, if you are interested in finding out more about play-based and playful learning this is for you.

29. Developing Inter-personal skills for Conducting Qualitative Research Interviews 29. Developing Inter-personal skills for Conducting Qualitative Research Interviews

This course aims to provide a practical and supportive guide for those wishing to use research interviews to collect qualitative data. Research methods courses and texts offer a wealth of information on types and uses of interviews and the advantages and disadvantages of their use, but there is little guidance for those new to interviewing on how interviews can be conducted in order to reveal high quality and usable data for your research. Simply turning up with a list of questions is often not enough to achieve the depth of insight which you require. In this session we will hear from a range of researchers about their experience of interviewing in both routine and more challenging circumstances and explore the inter-personal skills which we use to collect interview data.

In the first part of the session, a panel will facilitate discussion on the following topics:

  • How to arrange and prepare for interviews
  • How to negotiate access to interview respondents in different contexts
  • Asking the right questions and getting to the truth
  • Robust and ethical practice for interviewing
  • Building trust and dealing with difficult interviewees
  • Navigating challenging interview contexts and topics

This will be followed by a small group exercise where participants can develop their interviewing skills, practice questioning techniques and responding to different interviewee reactions.

30. Relocating the HR Department to the lecture room using Blackboard’s collaborate ultra platform: An undergraduate and postgraduate HR assessment perspective, during the covid pandemic. 30. Relocating the HR Department to the lecture room using Blackboard’s collaborate ultra platform: An undergraduate and postgraduate HR assessment perspective, during the covid pandemic.

Increasingly, undergraduate and postgraduate HRM students undertake their studies with varied ranges of prior organisational experience. In turn, this impacts their ability to appreciate how theory works in practise. For example, while undergraduate (UG) students on a four year degree track gain placement experience, those on a three year track often have limited organisational experience ranging from experience of part-time work only through to no organisational experience at all.

Coupled with widening access demographics, many UG students are often doubly disadvantaged when it comes to appreciating how theory is applied in a given business and management setting. Postgraduate (PG) students, conversely, are increasingly international across many universities and tend to undertake postgraduate study without any prior employment experience. As such, their appreciation of organisational life is also limited, thus curtailing students’ understanding of the application of more complex HR theoretical debates in different organisational settings, too. This is all the more challenging when seeking to expose students to specific HR processes such as a learning and development training cycle or a recruitment and selection process. While guest speakers and company visits can help expose students to some HR realities, such approaches fail to immerse students in the competencies required to handle more complex, HR processes. As such, this workshop seeks to demonstrate how, using Blackboard collaborate ultra: a) UG students can obtain experience of delivering a focused learning and training event to external audience members and b) how PG students can gain experience of conducting a virtual panel interview.

31. Professional Practice Readiness in Occupational and Business Psychology (O&BP) 31. Professional Practice Readiness in Occupational and Business Psychology (O&BP)

Workshop Presenter: Dr Michelle Hunter-Hill, Chartered Occupational Psychologist (OP) & Behavioural Scientist, University of Roehampton. Programme Director: MSc Occupational and Business Psychology. Director at The Occupational Psychology Practice International

Becoming an effective Occupational or Business Psychologist (O&BP) takes time, commitment, and a high degree of readiness. While having good subject knowledge of psychology, including its application, is essential, it is one's readiness to practice (e.g. manage self, tasks, client expectations, select and use appropriate tools) that matters most. Being ‘ready’ for professional practice begins with an understanding of how our core values, beliefs, and behaviours can influence our approach. This workshop offers an opportunity to prepare for, and develop professional practice skills 

The focus of this PDW is on core consultancy skills required to engage in professional practice as an Occupational or Business Psychologist. It will demonstrate ways to use the Consultancy Cycle from the point of negotiating access to clients, identifying their needs, to implementing the project, and evaluating the effectiveness and impact of the outcome. Guidance on how to meet and embed BPS and ABP expectations to provide evidence-informed solutions to occupational and business problems around people selection, coaching, careers guidance, wellbeing, change, and employee satisfaction.  

Objectives: 

  • Learn how to get the most from your O&BP professional practice journey 
  • Discover ways to structure your consulting engagement through the use of the Consultancy Cycle and PRINCE2 approaches 
  • Engage in pair coaching to identify the professional practice areas you would like to develop 
  • Set professional practice goals using the SMART approach 

This interactive PDW will provide ample reflective and reflexive opportunities for O&BP practitioners to explore the Consultancy Cycle. A range of dual-thinking challenges will be presented to improve O&BP’s awareness of the needs and constraints of (a) practitioners, and the commissioning client(s). A good balanced diet of psychological and behavioural science theories/techniques, and PRINCE2 methodologies will be used to navigate the Cycle while keeping ‘best-practice guidelines and legal frameworks at the core. 

32. Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA) 32. Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA)

Are you looking for a novel and promising methodology that can help you developing great research and publications? Join us at the PDW on Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA)

What is NCA?

NCA is an emerging approach and data analysis method that is rapidly entering a variety of business and management fields. An editor of a 4-star journal commented: 

“From my perspective, [this NCA paper] is the most interesting paper I have handled at this journal, insofar as it really represents a new way to think about data analyses".

Aguinis et al. (2020) consider NCA a solution for methodological challenges in international business research. 

NCA is applicable to any discipline and can provide strong results even when other analyses such as regression analysis show no or weak effects. By adding a different logic and data analysis approach, NCA adds both rigor and relevance to your theory, data analysis, and publications. In this workshop we introduce the method and present applications in business and management studies.

How does NCA work? 

NCA understands cause-effect relations in terms of "necessary but not sufficient". It means that without the right level of the condition a certain effect cannot occur. This is independent of other causes, thus the necessary condition can be a single bottleneck, critical factor, constraint, or disqualifier. In practice, the right level of necessary condition must be put and kept in place to avoid guaranteed failure. Other causes cannot compensate for this factor.

NCA is a user-friendly method that requires no advanced statistical or methodological knowledge beforehand. You can become one of the first users of NCA in your field, which makes your publication(s) even more attractive. In the workshop we will discuss many examples of necessary conditions in different management fields, will present the latest developments of the method and will provide an illustrative example how the method can be used

33. Is Design-Driven Innovation the Next Competitive Advantage? An online participative-style workshop 33. Is Design-Driven Innovation the Next Competitive Advantage? An online participative-style workshop

Unlike the traditional ‘listen and discuss’ workshop format, this participative-style PDW offers attendees with a podium to open up real-world challenges and hands-on experience in the area of design-driven innovation.  The objective of this PDW is twofold.  First, it immerses attendees in practitioners’ experiences to view the associated challenges, failures and pain points through actors’ eyes, rather than focusing exclusively on the praise of design-driven innovation. Second, this PDW opens a platform for attendees to question existing assumptions and to experience the way of thinking and acting like a designer in managing innovation development.  An international panel, which is formed by academics, practitioners and policy makers from Japan, Germany and the UK, provides real-world cases and works with BAM delegates through a Design-Sprint process.     

Today, Covid-19 has had an unprecedented effect on national and global economy, the final impact on industries however will depend largely on how companies reshape their competitiveness.  To this end, design-driven innovation has been viewed as the next competitive advantage to outperform competitors and to reshape economy.  For any BAM delegates who are concerned with and/or research in the relevant areas, this PDW is for YOU – a cross-country participative-style workshop not only to ‘know’, but also to ‘feel’ the experience in managing design-driven innovation.